Where is India’s Amazon?

This article was first published on capitalmind.in In 2019, Amazon made $281 Bn in revenue. Up 20% from 2018. That is the combined revenue of the top-5 revenue-earning Indian companies: Reliance, IOCL, ONGC, BPCL and SBI. A year later, in 2020, Amazon clocked $386 Bn, growing 37%. Put another way, Amazon added 1.4 times the total annual revenue of Reliance Industries as incremental revenue in 2020. Chart shows Amazon’s meteoric revenue growth since 1997: Yes, some of that growth in 2020 was aided by the pandemic but is not an aberration. Since going public 24 years ago, its annualized revenue growth rate is 41%.

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Fixating on Buffett is hurting your returns

It’s that time of the year when the world’s most awaited corporate communication comes out. My guess is if we take all publicly listed companies around the world (except one), and add up the number of times their management letters get read, that number would be dwarfed by that for Berkshire Hathaway and Warren Buffett’s annual letter to shareholders. At $300,000+ per Berkshire Class A share, it’s safe to assume only a fraction of those readers are potential buyers. All around the world, people from fund houses, financial media, popular investment blogs, investment advisories pore through the simply formatted, 20-page

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5 Lessons from Amazon’s stock price chart

Jeff Bezos recently made news (again) when he became ‘the world’s richest man’ with a net worth of over $90 Billion. This success certainly didn’t happen overnight. Over $10B of that was added within a few days in October 2017 after Amazon announced it’s third-quarter earnings and the stock went up 15% since early Sep to Mid-November 2017. Since then, there have been a host of articles with titles like If you had invested right after Amazon’s IPO, you’d be a millionaire. In short, Amazon’s stock price is up approximately 57000% in the 20+ years since it’s IPO. This means,

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What investors can learn from Bezos’s 2017 letter to shareholders

The mighty who fell: too big to succeed Levi Strauss, Eastman Kodak, Caterpillar, Heinz, American Express, Procter & Gamble, Compaq, Blackberry. Just a sample of companies, all legendary, that at some point, saw their growth stall, their market caps decline and their very existence questioned. Megatrends in technology and demographic shifts made some of their troubles inevitable. But, I can’t help but think there’s more to that. In my previous career as a management consultant, I had the opportunity to work with organisations across industries and geographies on a variety of business priorities. Every large organisation of pedigree is around because they’ve done

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